The Wonder of Wonder Woman

Warning: Some spoilers. Only scroll down if you’ve seen the new DC and Warner Brothers film Wonder Woman starring Gal Gadot

I didn’t realize how much I had missed the wonder of an action-adventure  film until I saw Wonder Woman last weekend.

I’ve seen so many from the genre that have been amazing visually and had a decent plot, but not a one left me in awe and yearning to immediately see again and again and again (with a few exceptions like the original Star Wars Trilogy, Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens, Raiders of the Lost Ark;  Inception, The Dark Knight, The Lord of the Rings Trilogy and The Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl)

But after seeing Gal Gadot become the Amazon warrior princess for more than two hours, that deeply refreshing and magical sense of wonder returned after a long drought. I walked out of the theater wanting to be Wonder Woman or in the very least have the same moral fiber and abilities. My other beloved heroes like Han Solo, Aragorn, Batman and Captain Jack seem pale in comparison to Diana.

There is something about the character and Gal Gadot’s portrayal that seems more authentic than any other hero that has graced the screen. Wonder Woman is certainly larger than life and has the powers of a god/goddess. Yet she is also down to earth. She’s not bound by ego or seduced by power. Diana doesn’t use tricks or charm or beauty. Nor does she put on any pretenses. She just is who she is. And the attributes that make up Diana/Wonder Woman is the wonder we deserve…errr…need to continue to believe in everyday:

Diana has a dream and she is determined to attain it. As a girl, Diana desires nothing more than to become a great Amazon warrior and protector like her mother and aunt. She never shies away from the difficult training to become the best she can be. And she doesn’t let the doubts and worries of the other women on Themyscira distract her from achieving her dream. As an adult,   Diana also never doubts her own abilities or who she is called to be. She never has the “I can’t do this” moment and chucks her lasso and tiara like many male super heroes have thrown their costumes in the trash. Diana is also determined to get that sword and shield of hers through a revolving door.


Diana sticks to her convictions and stands up for what is right even if she is greatly opposed.

Diana challenges her mother Hippolyta often in the first half of the movie: she insists that Steve Trevor is a good man and that the women of Themyscira should help him and the Allies defeat the Germans in WWI; she further believes that the war-god Ares is the master behind “the war to end all wars,” and that it is their duty as Amazons to stop him. Later in the film Diana stands up to the Allied generals who refuse to stop Ludendorff’s plan to gas thousands of innocents. She also constantly pushes Steve and the mission team (Sameer, The Chief and Charlie) to make the time to help others and defend the defenseless. And there’s the iconic scene where Diana–tired of being told not to help the helpless on their arduous journey to Ludendorff’s base of operations–steps out of a trench and leads the charge (enduring a barrage of bullets and explosives) to overrun a hill and village occupied by German forces.

Diana is brave and courageous. 

The scene in the alleyway where Diana uses her bracelets to block the bullets meant for Steve Trevor. But more importantly…The Trench:

Steve Trevor: This is no man’s land, Diana! It means no man can cross it, alright? This battalion has been here for nearly a year and they’ve barely gained an inch. All right? Because on the other side there are a bunch of Germans pointing machine guns at every square inch of this place. This is not something you can cross. It’s not possible.

Diana Prince: So… what? So we do nothing?

Steve Trevor: No, we are doing something! We are! We just… we can’t save everyone in this war. This is not what we came here to do.

Diana Prince: No. But it is what I am going to do.

Nuff said.

Diana is confident and compassionate. 

Women often get mislabeled as being soft, particularly if they are showing compassion. Diana/Wonder Woman proves once again that women (like any human being regardless of gender identity and sexual orientation) can be both. Diana is not disarmed or rattled by the fears and worries of Sameer and Charlie and she doesn’t spiral into self-doubt about the challenges of their mission. She also never waivers once she is convinced that something must be done to help those who are in peril. And she doesn’t quit being Wonder Woman when tragedy strikes like the gassing of the village she had previously helped save. She becomes more resolute about ending the brutality of Ludendorff, Dr. Poison and Ares. For Diana, confidence and compassion go hand-in-hand.

Diana’s confidence and compassion makes her a loyal friend.

Diana shows sympathy to Charlie, who has experienced much brokenness and loss, and gives him encouragement. She reminds him of his value to their mission group. Diana also listens with an open mind and heart to the perspectives of Sameer and The Chief as they share their difficulties as men of color. Even though she is clearly the most powerful and the wisest, she doesn’t push Steve Trevor aside and take over. And at the same time, she also goes against his orders and follows her own heart, mind and convictions to do what is best for the group and the world.

Diana kicks ass… and it’s a work of art.

There’s just something breath-taking, elegant and even graceful about how Diana/Wonder Woman takes out her foes. It’s much like watching a beautiful dance instead of male heroes and villains trading punches and ramming their bodies through walls. No smack talk and bravado either. She just gets it done. Diana/Wonder Woman is #neverthelessshepersisted.

Diana shows mercy.

At a pivotal point near the film’s end, Diana has an opportunity to destroy Dr. Poison for the suffering and death she has inflicted on many lives, including those of children. Instead of seeing a monster, Diana realizes Dr. Maura is a victim of the cruel monster of war–personified by Ludendorff and Ares. Diana also decides that more destruction and death of human beings will not make a bit of difference and thus, she sets aside the giant tank aside she is about to drop on the doctor.

Diana believes in love.

It’s the moment all fans of the film have been talking about non-stop (aside from The Trench).  In response to Ares contempt for human kind and his question of Wonder Woman’s devotion to ordinary people, Diana says:

“You don’t get what you deserve. It’s about what you believe, and I believe in love.”

And then she promptly eradicates the darkness and evil of Ares with a ferocious and illuminating light.

Throughout the entire film, Diana/Wonder Woman has made a choice to believe in love and to shine light wherever she goes.

In the film’s final scene, Diana writes in an email to Bruce Wayne that she has learned the following about herself, humanity and her path ahead:

“I used to want to save the world, to end war and bring peace to mankind. But then I glimpsed the darkness that lives within their light. I learned that inside every one of them there will always be both. The choice each must make for themselves – something no hero will ever defeat. And now I know… that only love can truly save the world. So now I stay, I fight, and I give – for the world I know can be. This is my mission now, for ever.”